Eastport Injection Molding Machine

How to Find a Palletized in Eastport ?

Whether the fabricator’s store is large or small, the Ironworker is the backbone. The Ironworker isn’t a single machine; it is five machines united into an engineering wonder. It has much more versatility than most people would imagine. The five working sections that are involved in the make-up of this machine are a punch, a section shear, a bar shear, a plate shear, and a coper-notcher.

A number of the cheaper ironworkers are constructed to employ a fulcrum where the ram shakes back and forth, building the punch go into the die at a small angle. This normally leads to the eroding of the punch and die on the front rims. The higher quality machines integrate a ram which moves in a direct vertical line and utilizes modifiable gibs and guides to assure a constant traveling path.

Pneumatic Gripper

When you look for a End of Arm Tooling (EOAT)  that develop a Palletized in Eastport, looks for experience and not only pricing.

That dedicates more life to the tooling, and allows the punch to penetrate the succumb right in the middle in order to capitalize on the machine’s total tonnage.

When looking for a design house that designs a Palletized in Eastport  don’t look just in Michigan , other States also have great providers.

Pneumatic Gripper

Major Parts Of An Excavator And How It Works

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Robotic System Integration

Summary:

Cabot Microelectronics used two different FactoryFix Experts for Robot System Integration to retrofit an existing Fanuc Robot Palletizing System that had been sitting unused in their facility due to an unsuccessful installation by the original Robot Integrator. Cabot found two qualified companies to do the work on-site at their facility in Aurora, IL by posting the project on www.factoryfix.com.

FactoryFix Experts:

Compass Automation & Elite Automation

Customer Benefits:

Full System Retrofit — went from an unsuccessful installation to fully operational automated system.

Automated Production — Elite Automation programmed the system to run unattended for 3 shifts.

Added Functionality —Elite Automation also modified the system to run an additional part number.

Technologies:

Refurbished Fanuc R-2000 robot with IR vision system

Fanuc ArcMate robot with custom ultra-sonic knife tool

ATI Tool Changer System

Custom designed Piab vacuum gripper End-of-Arm Tooling

Solution:

Compass Automation, Inc worked with Cabot Microelectronics to redesign a 2 robot system to de-palletize large bags of silica powder, cut-open the bags using an automated ultra-sonic knife, and dump the powder into a large hopper. The system had been sitting idle on the customer’s floor for over a year due to a poor execution by the initial Robot Integrator. Cabot used FactoryFix to find local automation companies that had the expertise to retrofit the system and get them back on track. After posting their first project under the End of Arm Tooling Design category, they were connected with Compass who quoted and eventually won the job. Compass designed and built a complicated vacuum gripper that accommodated two different product sizes. The gripper also had to be designed with automated flappers to mimic a human shaking the bag over the hopper to make sure all of the powdered silica got out of the bag. The second robot tool that Compass was hired to design was a custom ultra-sonic knife tool that was mounted on the refurbished Fanuc Arc-Mate 100 robot. This tool was designed for ArcMate robot to cut slits into the silica bag while the R-2000 robot was holding it with the vacuum gripper.

Jacek from Elite Automation programming the R-2000 robot.

Once the two EOAT’s were built and mounted to the robots, Cabot Microelectronics needed to find another local supplier to come in and program the system (Compass had a scheduling conflict). They posted the project request on FactoryFix and were connected with Elite Automation, an automation company based out of nearby Carol Stream. Although it was a complex system, Elite Automation wrote the program and successfully ran-off the system within two weeks. Elite has since been hired by Cabot Microelectronics several more times for program modifications and upgrades.

Project Video:

Plastic Injection Machine

Blacksmith Power Hammers or Trip Hammers

If you have ever worked with a power hammer you see the blacksmithing world through different eyes. Power hammers really fall into 3 basic categories, Hydraulic Presses, Mechanical Hammers, and Air Hammers. They are all designed to increase the amount of force that you can apply to the steel. This means you can do more work in a given amount of time and you can work bigger bar. Suddenly this opens a whole new creative reality with the steel.

Hydraulic Presses

I don't use one in my shop but I have used one years back in another smiths shop. Hydraulics have tons of power (literally) and can force the metal into many different shapes very effectively. They are useful for extreme controlled force applications such as forcing steel into preshaped dies, or cutting at specific lengths or angles etc.

This is not an impact machine such as mechanical hammers or air hammers, and is not fast. It can be used for drawing out steel but this is tedious. Although it would save time from drawing out by hand and allow you to work bigger bar I would go crazy with the slow process.

Essentially the machine is a hydraulic ram mounted on a frame with an electric pump. You use a foot control to squish the metal. Step with the foot apply more force. Release the foot the dies back off then you can move the bar and apply the force again in a different spot.

There are a couple of positive aspects of a hydraulic press. They have a small footprint, and require no special foundation. Prices are manageable for this type of tool. About $2000.00 in my area. There is no impact noise or vibration with this type of machine. The whine of the hydraulic pump can be loud but it doesn't have the same annoyance factor for neighbors as the impact from a hammer. Presses are rated by the number of tons pressure that the ram can produce. 20 ton, 40 ton and 60 ton are common sizes.

Most smaller blacksmithing shops use 50 lb to 150 lb size. There are two subclasses of air hammers that you should be aware of. The self contained and the air compressor version. The self contained uses two air cylinders. One is the compressor cylinder and is driven by a motor. This cylinder provides air to the hammer head cylinder. So every up stroke of the drive cylinder forces the hammer head cylinder down and every down stroke forces the hammer head cylinder up. Valving causes the air to be either exhausted or sent in varying amounts to the hammer head cylinder. This provides the control on the stroke and  force applied to the steel. This cyclic timing is governed by the speed of the electric motor.

The air compressor reliant air hammer feeds off a constant line pressure and has a feed back circuit built into the design. The hammer head travels up and trips a switch that tells it to go back down. Once it reaches a certain travel point another switch tells it to go back up. The amount of the exhaust dictates both the speed and the force applied to the steel.

Although air hammers appear to be a bit more complicated than a mechanical hammer there are actually less moving parts and less to wear out. I find them to be more versatile. You can adjust your stroke and force just by moderating your foot peddle. With a mechanical hammer you have to make a mechanical adjustment to change your stroke height. Your force is controlled by the speed of the impact or the speed of rotation.

Plastic Injection Machine

You Can Find a EOAT in Eastport here:

 



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